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Comments

kememticqueen

The ingnorant names must stop.

kemeticqueen

Okay, sorry for the typo, but yall feel me!

satisfiedsistah

I've experience this working in the health field. Often you cannot even "pronounce" the names
of these children which would causes them embarrassment. But more funny or sad than that is in the newborn nursery many mothers couldn't spell the names they gave their kids...they had to sit and figure them out "phonetically"

How about Bonequisha? I think that one says it all.

Guy Real

I've always wanted to name my first child Gilgamesh, but no one has ever felt that suggestion

nubian

i think a lot of it has to do with black folks trying to connect with some authentic sense of blackness, and that would be to make up names that aren't "white" sounding...

Don't Push Me

Yeah, I can feel the desire to try to connect to some sense of "Blackness"... I interpret that as an attempt to keep it African.
But I've always thought that African names were given with purpose and intent.
I think some of us have gotten away from that part and have focused more on the "sound" and uniqueness of a name--that's ignorance. I mean, what does that do?

And as for Gilgamesh...Dude, don't do that. (T-Dub: I'm just looking out for you.)

nubian

i agree, luckily my mother didn't name me tyquesha or something like that. but i also can't say that i enjoy my "white" name.

SmartBlkWoman

I don't think that these kids ( and yes I said kids because black people with college degrees and/or who have traveled the world are not naming their children after liquor) are choosing names with any sort of sense of blackness or with an African identity in mind.

They are just trying to give their children unique names because they have no sense of strong cultural identity and don't know what other factors to use to name their children other than "cuteness" or "uniqueness".

lateefah

I am compelled to speak up on behalf of the young sisters that I have worked with over the years who’ve named their children rather interesting names. Yes, they too-the mothers often have rather interesting names themselves. These mothers often seek to provide their seeds with names that not just ‘sound pretty’ but names that reflect the dominant culture that exists within their own social boundaries.

I was so blessed to have parents who at that time where deep in faith, thus they named me after my temperament-Lateefah, meaning gentle and kind in old Arabic. Not all parents or should I say mothers are in a space of faith or historical knowledge when they give birth –nor do they have the council of you all to advise them to provide the royal names upon their seed-nor do they have an outlook on how these “African American” names will be perceived by the white market driven economy as the child awakens to the dominate world.

Yes, however tragic-there are solutions. For all of the bloggers that simply make funny of this paradigm-there are simple community based resolutions to begin to tackle the name game-if not only on a local scale. My circles of strong women-sisters have worked closely with young mothers during their pregnancy and birth processes and have provided rich historical and spiritual council. Moreover, the names will be as they may. If the child has an extended community of black women and men who can assist in their overall development-we can de-construct some of this madness of the loss of cultural and spiral identity by working with the mothers and communities to resurrect the holy process of naming a child -even after the child is born and has been given its legal name. Re-naming ceremonies for black babies are immensely powerful and cost little also we’ve been successful with providing young women with baby showers/sister circles to give her an understanding about the magic that she will bring into the world and the importance of the name. These things make a difference not in just how the child is called upon by persons surrounding them but by the way the mother parents her little one.

I need to say that I was super young momma and am so happy in naming my child a timeless name.

Thank you so much to the sister who wrote the original blog. You are recreating thier ( the young ones) worlds by affirming thier minds and hearts.

One luv

miss ahmad

Go on cousin, speak on it!

Don't Push Me

Thanks for the balance of your comment. It's refreshing to hear about your work with our young mothers.

Perhaps I can initiate a name changing ceremony for myself since I was named after my father. Just a thought.

ladydaynyc

Intriguing...I have met a young girl named Simplicity from my daughter's daycare. One day a teacher in Simplicity's class was irate as she read a note the mother sent to school. I asked what was wrong (nosey am I) and she handed me the note and left the room to cool off. The note read; "My daughter's name is spelled SYMPLICITTI. Please do not send home her drawings with her named misspelled again." I didn't know what to do with that at all. While I understand this may have cultural implications etc. but come on hello!

emergingphoenix

I love that idea lateefah. I have to admit, that I don't know anyone (family/friends) who has given a child a completely made up and commercial name, but I will be sure to mark that down for memory. I don't know how popular that is, but it should get more recognition.

Not to say these women/parents should be forced to change their children's name (I am sure some people will fight against that), but if they decide later on that they were trippin' (for lack of a better word) when they named their child, it gives them options.

Fresh

My mama didn’t know it was a cancer. She had heard a nurse say it, and she thought it was a cute name…”

*blank stare*

Don't Push Me

I've always believed our people to be culturally creative. Hence we have a whole other language of words and names. Some of them beautiful. Some of them are "Beyonce?" Some of them are African. And some of them are "Alize(h)?"
The intention of this blog was to discuss it in order for us to bring it to our consciousness.
I admire any and all who are courageous enuff to address this topic in their everyday lives and surroundings--this blog and comments included.

Hopefully, we gave T-Dub some second thought about the name "Gilgamesh."

Thanks.

meli

Give thanks to the sistah who commented on young sistahs and why they choose the names they do. Culture! A whole nother subject, especially when its regarding Black People. Where have the powerful names gone. Yes, we still have them but it seems to me that alot of mothers wanna be authentic with Naming and think about the meaning & destiny later! Granted circles and conscious mothers and fathers such as yourself are 'bringin forth powerful seeds with powerful names. Some names just make u shake your head

That Girl Tam

This is my first time here, and this post is FUNNY AS HELL...my stepson's mother (who I refer to as T.B.M. (that's Triflin Baby's Mama) her name is TiaSonya...her sisters are TiaMoyo and Shaiwan (SHY-WON). YIKES!! Like my girl P said, once they take the baby from the womb, clean them all up, and the parents are looking into these new little faces at the sweetest baby (who later grows up to be a nightmare)...how does one say, "Aww...let's name them ________." (fill in the blank)

Damn shame...

latisha

Very insightful on the re-naming ceremony. Don't know how many would partcipate though. But wow Lukemeiah (sp?) But does that beat Nacious. Yes I know a child named Nacious, and Oukateesha (AUK-AH-TEE-ShA_

I plan to name my child Caleb or Riley. I love Simplicity.

latisha

i meant simplicity when it comes to naming children. NOT THE ACTUAL NAME

lemme clear it up

Don't Push Me

Latisha:

There is no need to clear up your statement of simplicity. If you meant it as a name, you woulda spelled it "SYMPLICITTI." Right?

And "Lukeemiah" is spelled as you see it.

But hold up, Outkateesha?!! Aw hell... And "Nacious?" That's wrong. I'm going to have to add those to the list. (See edits on original post)

Jai

I am very happy I found this site. Very insightful folks up in this piece. As a idealist 21 year-old, right out of college, I had an opportunity to work with families of children with special needs. While working with these families, one of my moms had a new baby and attempted to name this beautiful blessing Cocaine Champagne. She said she liked how it sounded. I won't make any underhanded comments about this maybe being the way this child was conceived (hush...lol). I will say that I was extremely happy when the head nurse of pediatrics came in to inform mom that she had to choose a different name for the child. They sat down together and picked out a much better name. Since then, I have moved on to name my own children names that will not hinder them in our current society, while paying homage to my heritage. (I am Jaquita. Trust me, you are initially judged by your moniker.)

By the way, I am feeling the Gilgamesh. A good name for the journeys of life. But, I might not be a good judge of names. I wanted to name my son Maximillian. Historically, a very strong name but folks was threatenin' to beat me down in the birthing room so...no Maximillian.

Tiki

You have me DYIN' over here! MORPHIUS?? LuKEEMiah? Oh my goodness. You're not trippin'. On a serious note, I just couldn't stand slapping my child with a spelling bee name, that has absolutely no meaning behind it.

jameil1922

wow... i knew of girls named daiquiri, bonequeesha (white girl), and aquanetta. yes, she was named after the hair spray. foolishness. i also knew boys named laroyce and lamychael. your parents really hate you. i'm glad there are renaming ceremonies and nurses who will step in instead of going home laughing at the stupid nigger in obstetrics today.

Pamela

I picked up a small neighborhood paper last week and on the bottom of the front page I saw the photos of 2 precious children (a girl and a boy)on opposite sides of the page.

The caption over the photo on the right read: Happy 4th Birthday Chardonnay!

The caption over the photo on the left read: Happy 5th Birthday Bicardi Rolex!

I thought it was Happy Hour!

kristen

i know of a girl who named her daughter "amunique" as im i'm unique. ghetto as hell. we need to stop the foolishness

and gilgamesh? as in 'the epic of'? negro please get help

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